Hot Hobbies & Toys Posts

Bubblebot: Build Your Own Gigantic Bubble Generator

Love bubbles but hate the toil and trouble of using your own lungs to blow them? Allow us to introduce Bubblebot, the latest Arduino-powered toy to attain celebrity status on Instructables. It's not an easy project by any means—even the Basilique du Sacré-Cœur has fewer steps. But come on, it's an automated giant bubble robot! It's worth it!

How To: Create a custom checkered gun stock

Want to add a personalized touch to your favorite gun? Looking for some ways to dress up the stock on a new rifle? Checkering a gun stock is a way to add a little unique twist to your favorite rifle or gun. It is not an exceptionally hard technique to master, and you only need a few basic tools to do it. This tutorial from Midway USA shows you how to create a custom checkered gunstock for any wooden stock.

How To: Make a flying helicopter out of office supplies

Bored in your cubicle all day? It's time for helicopter wars! This video shows you how to make a fun and simple helicopter out of some basic office supplies. The materials you will need are: a big paper clip, a smaller paper clip, a large aluminum can (such as from Rockstar or Monster energy drinks), a ruler, Scotch tape, a rubber band, a pair of pliers (if you have a Leatherman multitool, those will work just fine), a pen you can take apart for the long tube, a pair of scissors, and some pla...

How To: Make a helicopter powered by rubber bands

This is a great little rainy day project you can make for almost no money, or a fun party trick you can use at the next office Christmas party! You will need two disposable drinking cups (stiff plastic or paper will work best), a fairly thick straw, a sturdy paper clip, a thick rubber band, a cocktail stick, a bead and a plastic ring you can get from the neck of a soda bottle. Assemble as shown, and then let it go!

News: Carnivorous Furniture Eats Flies and Mice for Energy

PETA wouldn't consider James Auger and Jimmy Loizeau's ingenious flypaper clock very eco-friendly, but I might beg to differ. The clock doesn't require any electricity or batteries. Instead it captures flies and converts the bodies of the dead insects into energy. Eight dead flies makes for roughly twelve days of power. Not bad.

News: Hunting Hydrogen Balloons with Fireworks

A group of R/C helicopter enthusiasts (of the superbly named entertainment production company Dude Licking a Pole Production) outfit a mini 'copter with little missiles, and send it out to hunt balloons in the cold Swedish wild. Motivation: mystifying. Outcome: wonderful. It's like James Bond meets an arcade game. And it's got everything we love: R/C , fireworks, and great video game style motion graphics.

News: Haunted House in Rotting LEGO

Mike Doyle's latest LEGO house (perhaps even more hauntingly beautiful than the last) is a Victorian mansion that transcends the material so effectively, the plastic reads like real rotting bricks and mortar. Beautiful house-devouring trees, created with LEGO hinge cylinders to mimic the texture of tree bark, and ridged 3 mm hose, droid arms and other technic connectors for the creepy, spindly branches.

News: Arabian Camels Tortured By Remote Control Robot Jockeys

In the wealthy oil man's world of Arabian camel racing, the tradition of using child jockeys has been replaced with the use of small robo-jockeys in recent years. But after finally ridding the game of the mistreatment of children, the sport is now under scrutiny again. The Dubai police have discovered a new feature illegally added to the torturous, whip-endowed robots: hidden stun guns.

News: IBM's “Watson” Supercomputer Demolishes World's Top Jeopardy Players

A testament of man vs. machine will air on February 14th, 15th, and 16th when IBM's supercomputer "Watson" is pitted against the world's fiercest Jeopardy players, Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter, for a chance to win a cool $1 million. It took researchers four years to build Watson, a machine mastermind the size of ten refrigerators and equipped with complex algorithms capable of decoding the complexities of the human language (no small feat). Watch below as Watson kicks ass in a practice round ...

News: Functional LEGO Snow-Eating Beast

The Stilzkin Indrik is a mighty, mini LEGO Russian crawler, capable of lugging heavy loads over snowy terrain: "It has a large contact surface, which prevents it from sinking into the snow. It offers great traction on almost any surface, and loads of torque to get out of tight spots."

How To: Use the correct tires for the temperature and improve RC performance

Optimize vehicle performance by knowing the differences between the different tires available for your RC vehicle. Each type of tire (commonly referred to by the red dot, blue dot or green dot) is optimized for a specific operating temperature range. Knowing about the different temperatures and what tires are best suited for them could be the difference between first place and second. Find out more in this instructional video.

News: Polar Bears Play Bloody Game of Soccer With Snowball Spycam

Blizzard Cam, a 40 mph mobile spycam on skis, spies on a group of adorable polar bears (um, minus the blood stained faces) as they devour a pile of remains. Operated remotely, Snowball Cam is released from the Blizzard if scientists detect the bears may attack the device. The decoy can roll across most terrains (even up hill), and easily distracts the bears into a game of soccer. From a BBC TV program on polar bears.

News: Apple Engineer Builds Fully-Functional Ancient Computer With LEGOs

Apple software engineer Andrew Carol built a fully-functional replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, the world's oldest known scientific computer. The 2000-year-old analog device was used by the ancient Greeks to predict the year, date, and time of future solar and lunar eclipses accurately to within two hours. Carol put together the 110 gears (made with 1,500 LEGO Technic parts) in just 30 days. See how it works below. For more information, check out Fast Company's interview with Carol.

How To: Solve the Rubik's Cube intuitively without algorithms

Check out this three-part video tutorial on how to solve the Rubik's Cube intuitively and without algorithms. With this method there is no need to memorize complicated algorithms. Crack the Cube with sheer brain power, if you can. No one said you had to be a genius to solve a Rubiks Cube, you just have to have a little common sense and patience.

HowTo: Make a Jenga Pistol

Not only will this wood-block pistol make you the terror of your next family activity night, it'll actually improve your Jenga game! Through science! For, you see, the faster you can knock a block out of a Jenga tower, the shorter the amount of time over which it can exert a frictional force on its neighbors. Which means the whole kit-and-caboodle is much less likely to come tumbling down. Want one? You'll have to build it yourself. Which is fitting because the word "jenga" actually means som...